Social Psychology Network

Maintained by Scott Plous, Wesleyan University

Carey S. Ryan

Carey S. Ryan

  • SPN Mentor

I received my Ph.D. at the University of Colorado at Boulder. My first academic position was at the University of Pittsburgh where I taught for eight years. I joined the faculty at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 2001. My research interests include stereotyping, prejudice, and intergroup relations; group and organizational processes; cross-cultural research; social psychological processes in education, and program evaluation.

Primary Interests:

  • Applied Social Psychology
  • Attitudes and Beliefs
  • Culture and Ethnicity
  • Group Processes
  • Intergroup Relations
  • Organizational Behavior
  • Prejudice and Stereotyping
  • Research Methods, Assessment
  • Self and Identity
  • Social Cognition

Books:

Journal Articles:

  • Hausmann, L. R. M., & Ryan, C. S. (2004). Effects of external versus internal motivation to control prejudice on implicit prejudice: The mediating role of efforts to control prejudiced responses. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 26, 215-225.
  • Judd, C. M., Park, B., Ryan, C. S., Brauer, M., & Kraus, S. (1995). Stereotypes and ethnocentrism: Diverging interethnic perceptions of African American and White American youth. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 460-481.
  • Kurebayashi, K., Hoffman, L., Ryan, C. S., & Murayama, A. (2012). Japanese and American perceptions of group entitativity and autonomy: A multilevel analysis. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 43(2), 349-364.
  • Ryan, C. S. (1996). Accuracy of Black and White college students' in-group and out-group stereotypes. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 22, 1114-1127.
  • Ryan, C. S., & Bogart, L. M. (2001). Longitudinal changes in the accuracy of new group members' in-group and out-group stereotypes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 37, 118-133.
  • Ryan, C. S., & Bogart, L. M. (1997). Development of new group members' in-group and out-group stereotypes: Changes in perceived group variability and ethnocentrism. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 719-732.
  • Ryan, C. S., Bogart, L. M., & Vender, J. P. (2000). Effects of perceived group variability on the gathering of information about individual group members. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 36, 90-101.
  • Ryan, C. S., Casas, J. F., Kelly-Vance, L., Ryalls, B. O., & Nero, C. (2010). Parent involvement and views of school success: The role of parents’ Latino and White American cultural orientations. Psychology in the Schools, 47, 391-405.
  • Ryan, C. S., Casas, J. F., & Thompson, B. K. (2010). Interethnic ideology, intergroup perceptions, and cultural orientation. Journal of Social Issues, 66, 29-44.
  • Ryan, C. S., Hunt, J. S., Weible, J. A., Peterson, C. R., & Casas, J. F. (2007). Multicultural and colorblind ideology, stereotypes, and ethnocentrism among Black and White Americans. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 10, 617-637.
  • Ryan, C. S., Judd, C. M., & Park, B. (1996). Effects of racial stereotypes on judgments of individuals: The moderating role of perceived group variability. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 32, 71-103.
  • Shively, R., & Ryan, C. S. (2013). Longitudinal changes in college math students' implicit theories of intelligence. Social Psychology of Education, 16, 241-256.

Other Publications:

  • Ryan, C. S. (2002). Stereotype accuracy. In W. Stroebe & M. Hewstone (Eds.), European Review of Social Psychology, 13, 75-109. Hove, UK & Philadelphia, PA: Psychology Press.

Courses Taught:

  • Group Processes
  • Program Evaluation
  • Research Methods
  • Statistics

Carey S. Ryan
Department of Psychology
Arts and Sciences Hall 347E
University of Nebraska at Omaha
Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0274
United States

  • Phone: (402) 554-2466
  • Fax: (402) 554-2556

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